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Pakistan called 34th most corrupt country in 2010

ISLAMABAD: Pakistan goes down to 34th from previous 42nd rank in a global list of perceived corruption published on Tuesday by watchdog Transparency International.

Corrupt practices have increased in the country, the Transparency International said.

Denmark, New Zealand and Singapore maintained their top position on the list with scores of 9.3. They were followed by Finland, Sweden, Canada and the Netherlands while Afghanistan, Myanmar and Somalia came last with scores as low as 1.1. The US ranked 22nd on the list, down from 19th last year, with a score of 7.1 out of 10, compared with 7.5 in 2009, the Berlin-based corruption watchdog group showed in its Corruption Perceptions Index published today.

Iraq and Afghanistan came near the top of the global list. Nearly three-quarters of the 178 countries in TI’s annual survey scored worse than average on the scale, which ranges from zero (perceived to be highly corrupt) to 10 (perceived to have low levels of corruption). “The results indicate a serious corruption problem,” the Berlin-based anti-sleaze body said. “Allowing corruption to continue is unacceptable; too many poor and vulnerable people continue to suffer its consequences around the world,” said TI’s president Huguette Labelle.

Meanwhile, emerging economic powerhouse China is in 78th place. Countries that improved their rankings included Chile, Kuwait, Qatar, Ecuador, Jamaica and Haiti. The Czech Republic, Hungary, Madagascar and Niger also saw their scores decline on the index.
This year’s index, which measures the perception of corruption in the public sector, showed that 132 of the 180 nations reviewed scored below five on a 0-to-10 scale, with 10 indicating the least corrupt, Transparency said.

The index has become a benchmark gauge of perceptions of a country’s corruption, an assessment of risks for investors. It’s an aggregate indicator that combines data from as many as 13 surveys and assessments from 10 independent institutions, including country experts and business leaders.



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